Chin Implant Q&A’s with Dr Jag Chana

Date posted: 03 October, 2015
Posted by: JC
chin implant qas


Mr. Jag Chana answers some of the most frequently asked questions about chin implant surgery. This blog is to give you an overview of a procedure and a detailed description of a conversation with a practitioner.


Am I suitable for a chin implant?

A Chinese implant surgery addresses a small or receding chin, as well as a non-prominent anterior jawline. A small chin can throw off the facial harmony, making the rest of the features look smaller. In fact, it is not uncommon for patients to consult initially for a rhinoplasty procedure, only to be told that it is more important that they are emphasizing their nose and making it look larger than it is. In this case, a discussion about a combined implant with a rhinoplasty is quite usual.

Unlike some other facial enhancement surgery, there is not really a viable non-surgical alternative to chin implant surgery. The only exception to this is a situation where the bone can be advanced. This is more complex surgery usually reserved for specific reconstructive situations.


What does the procedure entail?

The procedure is performed under general anesthetic. There are two options for inserting a chin implant. It can be inserted through a small incision in the crease under the auspices of this product. A small incision will be made inside the mouth, just in front of the bottom row of teeth. From there, a pocket is made on the chin just in front of the bone which will house the implant. A silicone implant is placed in the pocket, and the incision is stitched closed.


What is the recovery?

Generally speaking, chin implant surgery is a day-case procedure, meaning that you’ll be able to return home on the day of your surgery. If the chin implant procedure has been carried out with a rhinoplasty then a one-night stay in hospital is preferable. You should take 1-2 days off work, in which time you should relax and keep activity to a minimum to allow recovery. You should wait at least 2 weeks for a full recovery, so while you can return to work, you should not resume participation in any sports or strenuous activities.

You can eat and drink as normal straight after chin implant surgery. If the stitches are inside the mouth you simply need to be careful with brushing your teeth until the stitches dissolve naturally.

 

What are the risks of surgery?

The risks of chin implants include infection. If an infection occurs, unfortunately, the implant will need to be removed, the infection treated and a new implant replaced approximately 3 months later. Other risks of bleeding are extremely rare. There are extremely rare risks of damage to nerves that supply sensation to the chin and lower lip.


Do chin implants need replacing?

Unlike breast implants which need replacing approximately after 10 years, this is not the case with chin implants. The chances of needing a replacement are rare unless there has been a change such as an implant shifting in position with age or if the size of the implant needs adjustment in the future. It is, therefore, possible that the chin implant could last a lifetime.


How do I proceed with chin implant surgery?

If you are interested in chin implant surgery, you should book a consultation with a registered and experienced plastic surgeon in order to proceed. During your consultation, a few things will happen:


1. Your surgeon will be able to make an assessment of you and your suitability for surgery – both physically and psychologically. As well as some health complaints that can render patients unsuitable for surgery, you may also be declined treatment if you seem to be pursuing treatment for the ‘wrong reasons’ or not in the right state of mind to receive treatment.

2. Your surgeon will also be able to make a realistic and tangible result that is likely to be achieved in your case. Everyone's facial anatomy is different and unique, and this one will have an impact on each individual surgery. You will be able to ask any questions in order to ascertain a full understanding of the treatment.

3. You will be able to build rapport with your practitioner, see the clinic in which you will be treated and their working style and it is right for you. Patients often report that this is one of the most reassuring things that can occur before treatment, and allows them to proceed with confidence. If this opportunity is not available to you and you are expected to meet with a representative, you should seek treatment elsewhere.

 

 

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